Mammals, Reptiles & Amphibians of Phu Quoc Island

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squirrel
squirrel

Wild animals of Phu Quoc island

Eighty seven (87) vertebrae species were recorded in Phu Quoc during the years 2000 to 2006 of which forty eight (48) including 20 mammal, 25 reptile and 3 amphibian species.

Phu Quoc Island supports various habitat types which include lowland evergreen forest, coastal sand, off-shore, forest on karst, Paperbark (Melaleuca sp.) timber forest, mangrove, scrub, Fabaceae forest and anthtropogenetic habitats.

The islands geographical location enables several forest and habitat types to co-exist, providing ideal conditions for a variety of mammal species.

changeable lizard
changeable lizard

Phu Quoc is now facing a number of pressing conservation issues. For example migrants from other parts of Vietnam now account for a significant proportion of the island’s growing population.

Although the most important economic activity on the island is fishing, not agriculture, the Kien Giang Forest Protection Department has identified shifting cultivation as a major threat to biodiversity in the buffer zone of the national park.

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Support Wildlife At Risk

  • Vision
    Toward a rich biodiversity where humans live in harmony with nature and wildlife.
  • Mission
    Wildlife At Risk (WAR) is dedicated to the long-term conservation of Vietnam’s threatened biodiversity. It aims to combat the illegal wildlife trade and promote the conservation of endangered species and their habitats.
banded krait
banded krait
  • Why
    Vietnam’s wildlife faces a desperate fight for survival in the 21st Century. Without urgent intervention, many of the Country’s endangered species will soon be wiped out. They are being driven to extinction by habitat loss, hunting, pollution and, above all, the flourishing illegal wildlife trade.